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Snickerdoodles (Cinnamon cookies)

Apparently snickerdoodles aren’t German, no matter how much I think the word sounds it. Whatever they are, they are also quick, soft, and delicious. I found this recipe whilst staying with my brother and sister-in-law when their twins were only two months old, and we all quickly decided that these were perfect snacks for the late nights that were going on. I usually make two or three times the dough in one go, and only bake some at a time. The rest I put into one or two bags and leave in the freezer for when I want something sugary.

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A Borodinsky of sorts

A gentleman came to our shop one day, and gifted us with a loaf of bread he’d made from our rye flour. Borodinsky, he called it. It was shared out at Elevenses the next day, and we were all enraptured. Sweet and slightly sticky, this bread is a delicious assault on the senses, and Rosie became determined to re-create it. A traditional Russian bread, the particular characteristics are coriander seed and malted rye flour. This is Rosie’s variant, using the ingredients easily available, and a spoonful extra molasses makes up for not having any malted rye flour.

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Ellen’s mutton Pie

Our mutton comes from ewes at the end of a long and comfortable life and so is perhaps the most ethically acceptable of farmed meats. It has the richest flavour of any meat and when enclosed in this nutty pastry made from rye flour makes a delicious and substantial meal.

Pastry

  • 500g wholemeal rye flour
  • 1/8 tsp salt (adjust to your preference)
  • 1 tsp dried mixed herbs or 1 tsp garam massala (optional but recommended)
  • 250g fat (I use part organic sunflower oil and part butter but anything will do)

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Tamarisk sour-dough bread

Sour-dough breads have long been common outside Britain, particularly Scandinavia, Eastern Europe and Germany. The process is akin to that of making yoghurt from milk in that the flour is partially “digested” by the sour-dough culture and this is claimed by some to make it easier for us to digest and better for you. Some people who have problems eating conventional yeast breads find this acceptable. We love the distinctive flavour although for some it is an acquired taste. You can use wheat or rye flour, but it does particularly bring out the best qualities of rye, especially if you add a little caraway seed.

Ingredients

  • 500g wholemeal rye or wheat flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt (adjust to your preference)
  • up to 300 ml warm water (about 45°C )
  • 1 tablespoon sour-dough culture
  • 1 or 2 teaspoon caraway (or any other seed of your choice)

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